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Hanging houses

Hanging houses in Cuenca

Curious, impressive and with history. The Houses Hanging of Cuenca it is one of the most unpublished buildings in the history of Spain. To a lesser extent known as flown houses or houses of the King they are located on the cornice of the Huécar river sickle and the most prominent are "The house of the mermaid" and "The houses of the Kings". Although its construction dates back six centuries, the declaration of Asset of Cultural Interest was the 25 October 2016 thanks to its unique architecture and its protruding balconies on the rocky massif.

Origin and birth

Hanging houses, a meaningful picture of the city routes

Hanging houses, a meaningful picture of the city routes

The first mention of this historical monument dates back to the Flemish painter Antón Van Den Wyngarede de 1665. In this painting you can see the entire San Martín cornice and the succession of balconies. They were built between the 15th and 16th centuries, although its origin is certainly unknown. Some claim they are of Muslim origin and others, medieval.

Due to the passage of time and its unprecedented building of Gothic architecture, many were knocked down or fell and only the three that we know today remain: the 'House of the Mermaid’ and the two ‘Houses of the Kings’, that the Cuenca City Council bought in the years 20 of the last century to restore them.

Nowadays, supported by pine beams, masonry and plaster mainly. If you look at the facade, we will see the ashlar ornaments, apart from the characteristic bars of the balconies. But nevertheless, the funny thing is that the hanging balconies, were built long after the house itself. It was in 1927 when they were installed and became a reference.

To get to them if we do tourism, the most interesting way we can take is crossing the also mythical bridge of San Pablo. Also built in the 16th century, it is another of the city's landmarks.. Although it ended up collapsing after 200 years, it was rebuilt the way we can go on 1903.

Why does it have multiple names?

The variety of names of this historical monument in Cuenca is curious. The truth is that the name of "The House of the Kings" originates because it was where the monarchs stayed on their visits. And although they were known to host kings, they were shelters for poor people for many years.

So much was his fame, that even the mint and stamp used the hanging houses. He did it to print them on a coin of the old pesetas, currently remaining as a collector's gallery.

Looking at the mermaid's house, there is a legend that has been told since the sixteenth century. The well-known story centers on Catalina, a beautiful lady from Cuenca, who became pregnant with Infante Don Enrique. This would later become King Enrique II of Castile. He recruited Catalina and her son so that no one would find out, until he had his son killed.

Legend has it that Catalina screamed for her son until one day she threw herself at the Sickle without enduring the pain. The inhabitants of Cuenca said that even after throwing themselves, I kept listening to her. And that those screams resembled the cry of a siren.

Nowadays, There are three houses hanging out of the eight that were at first and a good way to visit them and make a route under the slope of the Huecár river gorge is to stop along the way to catch up and regain strength in the magnificent Scorching restaurant Finca Embid.

Scorching Finca restaurant lounge Embid

Scorching room Finca Embid

further, this restaurant specialized in Grilled meat from own breeding It is located inside a campsite where you can stay to live a few days in this beautiful city and contemplate more areas of interest such as the enchanted city or know the history of the Cathedral of Cuenca.

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